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« Glittery Makeover for Canvas Slip-ons | Main | From Cheap to Classy »

May 27, 2012

Comments

Margot Silk Forrest

Surprisingly enough, I'd never thought of that before. I'll try to do that in the future! And if I can find anyone to wear the samples I've painted, I'll post new pictures of these sea-sponged examples. Thanks for the suggestion!

Bea

Hi, I'd find it really useful to see pics of the finished shoes on someone's feet. It just helps me to picture how certain types of finishes would go with real clothes...I love the bright designs, but I'm wondering if I would like them in action.

Margot Silk Forrest

No, the paint doesn't come off on your feet, sweaty or not, rain-soaked shoes or not. I first painted the insoles of a pair of my shoes four years ago and I've touched them up since them (they are sandals and the toe area shows), but no wearing off on my feet. Go for it!

Sandy

I keep meaning to ask. When you paint the insoles, how does that work for people who get sweaty feet? Does the paint begin to come off easily?
Sandy in the UK

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Destiny Carter (top) and Margot Silk Forrest are the mad scientists and creative geniuses behind Sassy Feet, the DIY craft site about transforming ordinary shoes and bags into wearable art. For their story, click here.
WHY "GLITTER SWEATSHOP"?
As you might know, we invented a glitter glaze that works on leather, manmade leather and fabric. It comes with a bottle of paint base and a little packet of glitter. Now, someone has to open the big jars of glitter that come from the glitter elves and spoon just the right amount of each of the 21 colors into their packets. Being the head honcho, Margot is that someone. Problem is, she's not the tidiest person in the Western hemisphere and after 20 or so packets, there are a lot of microscopic (but fetchingly sparkly) particles of glitter in her hair, on her cheeks, and decorating her nose. One day someone came in during this process and remarked, "This place looks like a glitter sweatshop!"